Chapter One_ Mind Map
 
 
 
 

Chapter One_ - Mind Map

3 years ago by: Rebecca Sutton
 
 
Chapter One Mind map: Early Western Texts
  • Chapter One: Early Western perspectives
    • Zionist narratives
      • Pioneer/frontier narrative
        • Revivalist literature - attempts to rewrite the Jew, create a 'New Jew' a Palestinian Jew using traditionally Arab characteristics(strong, passionate and masculine etc) as opposed to trad. Jewish attributes (weak, bookish, sexually deviant etc.)
          • Max Nordeau's 1898 2nd Zionist Congress speech "muscle" and "coffee house" Jews
        • Supported by the majority of Westerners after horror and guilt of WWII
          • No longer weak and passive but active and proactive, etc. links with colonisation within the texts
    • Orientalism
      • Edward Said's Orientalism
        • Mainly English/Anglo/Franco or American
      • Orientalist and the Hebrew Imagination - Yaron Peleg
    • Colonisation within the texts
      • Pioneer/frontier narrative
        • Europeans with modern technology conquer the desert 'make the desert bloom'
          • fits with the idea of the 'New Jew' - strong and masculine, reconstructing the Jewish narrative and Jewish protagonist
    • Colonisation of the literature
      • No Arab texts, (in)ability to produce alternative narratives
      • Bhabha's Third Space - hybrid cultures/hybrid identities - links with liminality
    • Biblical and Mythical Geographies
      • Bible used as reasoning justification for returning to the land - "Renaissance"
        • Metanarrative of redemption,myth of deliverance, right to the land
        • Exodus from Egypt, Binding of Isaac, Isaiah's End of Days prophecy, Ezekiel's vision of the Vally of the Dry Bones
      • Archeological digs used as justification - Jewish finds equals claim to the land
      • Wandering Jew (2000yrs)
      • Many people happy to support Israel as a home for the Jews because it was a convenient way of getting rid of them and Christians firmly believe in Eretz Israel (Jewish homeland). Also because of guilt from the holocaust
    • Portrayal/Construction of Arabs
      • 'Good' and 'Bad' Arabs
        • Arabs across the borders were the 'bad' ones
      • Arab inferiority/backward thinking (Education, farming etc.) Jews seen as progressive and advanced
      • Jews seen to want a positive relationship with the local Arabs - up to the 1980s?
      • Young Arabs challenge the old ways in favour of the more secular Jewish ways/opportunities (esp. females)
      • Arabs negative in many ways see El-Asmar's text, also any positives are when they defect to Zionist thinking and ways
    • Narrative addresses or does not address the conflict truthfully? fairly? even handedly? honestly? unable to see from an Arab perspective.
      • Arabs seen as 'terrorists'
        • Idea
      • conflict not addressed in any detail at all
    • Portrayal/construction of Jews
      • links to Peleg's Orientalist theories
      • The 'New Jew' & Texts related to Ch.1
        • the Sabra - ultra masculine
          • What does this do to gender roles? Where do females fit?
        • Borrowed traits from the Arab until 1967?
    • Structure of narrative
      • usually/often journey to Palestine from elsewhere (Europe or Yemen etc.) after WWII. Building new life for Jews on kibbutzim.Formulaic.
        • Identity crisis - Jewish and German/Yemini and Israeli etc.
        • Arabs used as a mouthpiece/tool for author to rebut any any Zioinist ideas/laws/issues raised. Uses their conversion to the Zionist way of thinking to explain and justify.
      • Romantic vision of Garden Utopia began in C19th
    • Movement through space and use of space
      • Jews more productive, busy, purposeful and enthusiastic; Jews want to conquer the space, to own it and control it. Active. Make the land work for them. New technology - tractors etc. PIONEERS
        • Shetyl to kibbutz
      • Arabs slow pace, 'backward' use of space, old ways/technologies/methods. Lazy, purposelessness, less industrious, passive.
      • Boundaries and borders - constructing and crossing
      • Ethno-national spatial styles: Arab/Syrian presented as feminine & kibbutz masculine
    • Construction of a national space inside the literature and constructing the literature inside a national space
      • links to Hebrew literature
        • Herzl's Altneuland idea of "background" and "foreground" maps
      • see below - boundaries and borders. Defining the space.
      • Bernard's national allegory/Yacobi article
    • Text as a space of adult power in order to construct and to shape the young adult
      • Jaqueline Rose, Nodelman, Nikolajeva, Beauvais etc.
    • Liminality of the young adult, liminal status of both Jew and Arab
      • Jew liminal as still immigrant and stateless, diasporic etc.
      • Arab liminal in the fiction written by Westerners but also in reality/history - omitted from decisions about the land/space
      • YA's liminal - pawns of adult ideologies, rebellious against the dominant adult ideologies etc.
    • Who are these authors? Why did they write this literature? Where did they stand ideologically? What is their relationship to I/P? Western lit echoes earlier Hebrew lit- the idea has to "sold" to America & the West?
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